Tag Archives: abortion

Can We Find God in Terrible Acts?

There is an argument made by a moral philosopher long ago.  He pondered, “Suppose there was a button, and pressing that button would bring untold riches, peace, and prosperity to the entire world.”  Sounds great, right?  The only cost, says the philosopher is that one “Chinese peasant would drop dead.” He then asked, “Who among us would press that button?  And who among us would want that button in wide currency?”

For the sake of argument, take that question and apply it to the issue of rape.  If I could press a magic button that would miraculously erase all rapes, past, present, and future, should I press the button?   At the face of it, the answer would seem to be an overwhelming, “Yes!” However, once one lets emotion subside, and begins to think rationally, it is clear that pressing this button, despite having good reasons for pressing it, would have unintended consequences.

I would NOT press the button–nor would I want such a button in wide currency. Yes, I know that sounds incredibly heartless. After all, why wouldn’t I want to erase all the evil and tragedy caused by rapes?  Quite simply, If I could erase ALL rape, hundreds of thousands of human beings would drop dead.   They would cease to exist. Many human beings owe their existence to being the result of a horrific rape.

This includes my son.  My precious 2-year old son is the product of a horrific rape.  While I mourn the reality of the rape that took place, I am indescribably thankful that he exists!  He is my son and he is of immeasurable value.  I love him.  God created him, and made a plan for his life.  Part of this plan included being conceived in iniquity.

Let me state this for the record, when it comes to the button:  I would not press that button.  Let me repeat that again:  I would NOT press that button.

Simply put:  in a fallen world, there are NO solutions.  At best, all that exist are trade offs.  A solution here, causes unintended consequences there.  What one person considers a solution, another man considers a negative.   It is unwise to act as if solutions do exist.  They don’t.  If we have learned anything in human history, we have learned that.

But, in terms of  pressing the button to erase all rapes, I couldn’t do it.  The death of a human being is too great a cost to me.  It is an unintended consequence that I am not willing to inflict.  While I find rape to be equal to slavery in the lecherousness and horribleness of what it entails, I find murder–the ending of a life created in God’s image–to be worse.

Remember this point:  Humans cannot create human beings.  They cannot do this.  Humans are created by God.  If human beings are created by God alone, and God allows a child to be the product of a rape (the product of two human beings with free will), does this in any way negate the fact that this child is created by God?   Of course not.

Let us see it another way:  f I could press a button right now, as many would like to do, and make Down Syndrome disappear, I would NOT.  Since magic doesn’t exist, eliminating Down Syndrome would necessarily mean eliminating people with Down Syndrome.  It would entail murder.  It would mean genocide.

How about another example:   If I could press a button right now, and make all racism, past, present, and future disappear, would I do it?  Well, since magic doesn’t exist; to remove all racism would mean to remove all racists.  This would involve the murder of human beings.  This cost is too great. As much as I despise racism, I despise the murder of human beings more.

A last example:  I find Islam to be a horrific religion.  I hold to the position that an accurate reading of Islam does neccesarily lead one to embrace jihad.  Be this as it may, I would not press a button that would erase Islam, past, present, and future from the face of the earth.  Since magic doesn’t exist, this endeavor would mean removing those who practice Islam.

Though I disagree with Muslims and hold many of them in contempt, I value their lives.  While the prospect of eliminating all traces of Islam may be intriguing, the cost is too great.

For the Christians among us,there is something incredible about these words: “As for you, you meant evil against me, but God meant it for good…”

It is sobering and hard to accept this at the face of it, but God can even use something as despicable as a rape to bring Himself glory. God is in the world, using its successes and its failures for His glory.

Think about that.  God’s sovereignty is such that your past is not a direct indicator of what your future will be.  God decides your path.  Our lives are in His hands.  He can take an unmitigated disaster and make a symphony out of it.

The rape of a woman should never end in the murder of the child. God can use that child for great things.  History provides much evidence to support this.  The testimony  of a child of rape can change the lives of millions.

I believe my son, the product of a horrific rape, will be a great man of God.

I wouldn’t press the button. I would destroy the buttons.

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Pro Choice Vs. Pro Life Logic

 

Disclaimer: This isn’t a comprehensive rebuke of the pro-choice position:

I got into a conversation this evening with someone taking up the dubious “pro-choice but personally opposed position.”  I thought I would share with you a bit of my reply.

The person I was dialoguing with said, “I don’t think you can label abortion right or wrong—it is merely unfortunate.”

It isn’t often that you get a softball when dialoging with abortion apologists, but this was a hanging curve.   Why would abortion be unfortunate?  Why exactly?  There must be a reason—and that must be a reason that the person thinks to be worthwhile, or they would have just said, “I wouldn’t have one, but I don’t care what others do.”  Notice, the person said it IS unfortunate.

I replied, “Your first point is noted; however, I could easily say, Eichmann and Goebbels didn’t enjoy killing Jews—that isn’t why they did it. They just worked for Hitler.”  Its not like it was their fault. They were just “following orders.”  How unfortunate for them!  I went on to say, “You would rightly note that such thinking is reckless and irrelevant.  They were guilty of actual crimes against humanity.”  But, what If I replied, “What crimes?  Nah, it was just unfortunate that they did that.”  How would they reply to that?  To what absolute would they point?  How do they know what is right or wrong?  By preference? By feeling?  In some countries, they love their neighbors.  In others, they eat them.  Do you have a preference?  Or is the latter just unfortunate?  This coincides with my friends previous statement that “Abortion is unfortunate.”  This is nothing more than relativism.

If things are just fortunate or unfortunate, there is no right, no wrong…No evil. Things just are.  Things are just unfortunate or not.

But here is the rub:  Why would a thing be unfortunate in the first place? In calling someont unfortunate, isn’t a person making a truth claim or a judgement by saying this? Why is abortion unfortunate, rather than just something that happens—arbitrarily in nature? I can think of no other reason to call it unfortunate except for the fact that the developing fetus might just in fact be a person—and we know that killing persons is wrong—whether on purpose or by accident. Can you think of another reason why an abortion would be unfortunate?  This is the problem with the “I’m pro-choice but personally opposed” fallacy.  Why would a person be personally opposed?  For what reason?  I can only think of one.

I noted that, “You go on to state that an abortion is between a woman and God.”  That is a VERY interesting line. In fact, I haven’t heard that phrase uttered by anyone on the pro-abortion side…EVER.  I commended them for it. What I often hear is, “It’s between a woman and her doctor.”

The truth is, when we bring God into the equation, we subject ourselves the world of absolutes. “It’s unfortunate” goes out the window when it comes to moral questions.  Therefore, the apologists for abortion cleverly remove the word God from the decision process.  When we enter this paradigm, what we personally believe about the morality of an issue doesn’t matter. Under a theistic paradigm, things are either right or wrong, regardless our relationship toward them.  Right exists whether we acknowledge it or not.  The same goes for wrong.  They are ontological categories.  If a thing is right, it is right even if we do not acknowledge that it is right.

But back, to the initial issue,  my friend was basically saying, “Just because you have a religious qualm with abortion, that doesn’t mean that the federal government should be able to legislate.” So, I applied the same logic to another issue: “Just because you have a religious qualm with slavery doesn’t mean that the federal government should legislate against it.” Do you see the problem? If our religious convictions can be pushed aside, then what are we left with?  If God is taken away, all we have left is man and the State.  That is a precarious position to be in.

And even at that, the use of the word “shouldn’t” invokes the absolue.  Why?  Is slavery wrong or is it just something that we “shouldn’t” do?  Why “should” the federal government legislate against slavery?  Who says?

In a relativistic framework, one could say, “I’d personally rather they didn’t keep slaves,” but they cannot say “shouldn’t.” Why?

Could it be because we know that things are either good or evil?  If that is so, how long will we continue to call abortion unfortunate?

Here are the basic questions of abortion:

Does abortion take a life?  I’d argue, yes.  Some might reply, “But we don’t know that a fetus is a life.”

In this case, there are only have 4 possibilities:

  1. The fetus is a life and you know it
  2. The fetus is not a life and you know it.
  3. The fetus is a life and you do not know it.
  4. The fetus is not a life and you do not know it.

Only one of those justifies an abortion.  The problem is, no embryology text supports #2.  So you are left with 1, 3, and 4.

How many potential babies will we allow to be murdered based on an agnostic (1, 3, or 4) position?

If a baby might just be under a haystack/or not—would you feel comfortable jabbing a pitchfork into it to find out?

Not a chance.

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An Election That I’d Rather Not Have To Be A Part Of.

My daughter is old enough to understand at least peripherally, what the Presidential election in our country is about. She has noticed the candidates on television. She has heard my wife and I talk back and forth about what is happening, the candidates themselves, and the policies that are and aren’t being put forth. Unfortunately, she has also heard some of the negative things that this campaign has brought about.
She is smart, perceptive, and asks honest questions.
How does one explain what is happening right before our very eyes to a child who is still developing a worldview? When she asks me point blank, “Daddy, which one do you want to win?” what do I say in reply? It isn’t easy.
We are truly faced with a dismal choice.
What I want to do with this space is not endorse a candidate. I do not want to persuade you to vote this way or that. I want to just note a few things that I think have been overshadowed by the shrill voices that unfortunately exist on both sides of the debate—and even exist in the camp that has distanced themselves from this election altogether.
The first thing I want to note is that when you really think about it, there is really nothing new going on here. Sure, the stakes may seem higher, and the controversies may be over different things, but really—are we experiencing something new here? Is this really the first time that real questions about candidates moral well-being have been brought into question?  Surely the choice between Douglas and Lincoln was just as stress inducing.
Contrary to the opinion of the Clinton apologists in the 90’s, elections of presidents do concern the character of candidates. Character is quite important. As the right sees it, the left always has a questionable character because of the policies they put forth. On the left, the right always are failures of moral character because they are unevolved Neanderthals. Think about that for just a second: You may hear a conservative criticize his or her opponent in strong terms. They may even call them immoral. But be honest, how many times have you heard a conservative Presidential candidate call a liberal candidate evil or suggest that they are influenced by evil? Hardly ever. What you hear more times than not is a serious condemnation of their ideology and their ideas.
On the left however, you often hear something altogether different. Instead of actual discussions of policy, you hear allegations of the candidate wanting children to starve, blacks to become slaves, killing dogs by putting them on the roof of their car, or pushing someone’s grandmother over a cliff. There is often a criticism of the person—not the issues.  I mean, what presidential candidate from the Republican party hasn’t been called a sexist, a rapist, a homophobe, or a war monger?  Do you remember what the left was able to do to Mitt Romney?  He is a stand up guy.  They were able to plant into peoples minds that he killed his dog by placing it on the suitcase rack of his car.  They were able to paint him as a guy who cancelled an employees health insurance because they got cancer.
Our current situation may be different from others in that we find ourselves in a situation in which the character of both candidates are not desirable. Leave the issues aside. The candidate from the Republican Party, Donald Trump, and the candidate from the Democratic Party, Hillary Clinton, both have questionable characters. Now, I myself, would love to vote for someone else. I could vote for Gary Johnson or Ted Cruz. Or better yet, I could vote for Calvin Coolidge or George Washington. Unfortunately, however, neither of them are on the ballot this November.
What is one to do in a situation like this? I clearly can’t vote for candidate A because of his character. I can’t vote for candidate B because or her character. I cannot vote for Calvin Coolidge—who has great character—because he isn’t on the ballot. What do I do?
For starters, I don’t go trying to make excuses for the candidate of the party I typically align with.  No Christian should make excuses for Trump or Clinton’s behavior.  Donald Trump from the Republican Party has been a playboy his entire adult life. Recently however, it has been revealed through a video that he has made lewd (read: unequivocally despicable) comments about specific women. In this video, which was recorded without his knowing, he boasted in a Don Giovanni-like way about his sexual exploits—some seemingly edging toward being descriptions of sexual assault.
I cannot excuse, explain away, endorse, look past, or be complacent to those facts. They are horrific and I denounce them as I would denounce my son for saying them.
Hillary Clinton, on the other hand, has engaged in her own nefarious activity. We’ve got her treatment of women who claimed to be raped by Bill Clinton, we have her email scandal, and we have her inability to act when it came to Benghazi—resulting in the death of 4 Americans. I am not going to go into the complete sordid history of Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump, so let’s do this to be fair:
Both candidates have lived lives and said and done things that are completely and unequivocally reprehensible. Both should resign in disgrace.
For me to support Donald Trump at this point just because he is a Republican would be an act of obsequious docility. For me to give my vote to Clinton would be just as bad.
We are at an impasse it seems. What do I do?
In my view, and perhaps I am wrong, in a situation like this, we vote on proposed policy. Granted, in this election, neither have overwhelmingly great policies. One has horrific policies while the other has some policies I like, and some that I don’t like. The one that is least despotic, least statist, least globalist, least tyrannical, more likely to uphold the Constitution—and the one who could potentially save the lives of the unborn— is the one that I would choose. This has been my way of thinking since I began voting.
As a side note: My activity as a voter began in the 2000 election. I voted for George W. Bush. Now, I want to put this out there because I think it is necessary to say: I was not a product of the religious right. In fact, I was not aware of Jerry Falwell until after 9-11. I only knew who Pat Robertson was because I would see him on television and ask my grandmother who he was. I did not associate them with politics.
Even in the Baptist churches I grew up in, I do not remember being shaped politically. I do remember being shaped to have a certain interpretation of the scripture, end times, and a view toward certain theological issues (which I may hold different views on now). The only political issue I can remember being harped on constantly in the churches I grew up in was abortion. But to be fair, I don’t remember any candidate’s names being attached to this issue. I say that to say, I do not align with the Republican Party because conservative Christians have typically done that. Not at all.
If I were to be honest, I would say that both of my parents and my grandmother who lived with us were staunch conservatives. My dad was an Air Force pilot and as such, I grew up in a particular culture, that emphasized the greatness of America, while at the same time pointing out the truths of mistakes and errors in human judgment.  I was never taught that America was perfect.  I was taught that our of all the world systems of government, the one we have in the United States is the best. When it came to politics and elections, my parents never told me who to vote for. They never described my Christian faith as being something indissolubly linked to a political party. To be fair, I think I may have heard a few questions like, “How can a Christian support abortion,” or “We believe marriage is between man and a woman,” but that was the extent of it.
What I was more likely to hear was a critique from my dad about immoral taxation through threats, coercion, and intimidation for the purposes of benevolence, or a discussion about the legitimate role of government in a free society.  These are ideas that hail from a classically liberal view.
I say that to say: We did not sit at the dinner table discussing why it was my duty as a human being to be a conservative Republican. My political formation happened much later.
I believe that all people are designed by God to be free. I also believe that we have the right as human beings—and certainly as Americans— to have private property. Our most basic piece of private property is ourselves. Now, I do not want to get into a theological dialogue here. I understand that all things ultimately belong to God—even me. But as a human being, I am responsible for myself. I am the one responsible for my most basic property. Because of this, I cannot support abortion in any way. Why? Because it denies the right of another person their private property. I support a mothers right to choose. What I cannot support is a mothers right to do away with the private property of another person; namely, the unborn baby. I believe we are a minority of one.  For that reason, I am a one issue voter when it comes to abortion.
So, with an issue like that, I can look at proposed issues. Hillary Clinton on the one hand, wants to increase access to abortion. Trump on the other, is a bit of a mystery. For much of his life he has been pro-choice. Lately however, and many conservatives feel he is only doing it to get votes, he has shown a contrition for those views and now considers himself pro-life. He has gone so far as to chosing a Vice Presidential candidate who is one of the more highly regarded pro-life legislators, and he has released a list of 20 judges who he would nominate for a vacant Supreme Court seat. This list is a who’s who of pro-life people.  That is certainly a major issue for me.
If faced with a decision to have a president who would add one more abortion each year to our yearly total, or have a president who would reduce it each year by one, I would choose the latter.
Even just one life means that much to me. One life.
Another reason I will choose from the two major party candidates is because of duty. As an American citizen who has the right and the duty to vote, not voting—or protest voting— is not an option. Too many men and women have died for my right to vote. A man in my church went to Normandy in his late teen years so that I would not be governed by a German superpower. I will not disrespect him by not voting. I would never desecrate the honorable sacrifice our soldiers have given by not voting. On the other hand, voting third party isn’t an option either. One of the two major party candidates will be our President. I could never look a serviceman or woman in the eye again knowing that from the two candidates, I did not give serious consideration and choose the one who would be a more effective commander in chief. After all, a man or woman might live or die based on who holds that office—regardless how I feel about the candidates on the ballot. For that reason alone, I will choose.
I know my argument isn’t complicated and it doesn’t invoke any of our very popular and often published public theologians. The thing is, the United States existed for quite a while before they arrived on the scene. No disrespect intended (I think highly of the men I am thinking of), but I do not need their blessing or their input into how I should vote or not vote, or their historically dubious (at times) understanding of how our Republic should choose a president. In their hand-wringing and chastising about the lamentable and indissoluble link between the religious right and the Republican party, they are guilty of that which they decry: Pairing politics with the gospel.
If I think that using the gospel to justify alliance with a political party is wrong, isn’t it wrong to use the gospel to decry alliance with a political party?
To me, and I am not intending to lay this at the feet of the aforementioned men, I see an effort by many in the evangelical community to want to seem relevant to the secular culture. I see a desire to be printed in the New York Times. I see a desire to be interviewed on CNN. I see a desire to not be thought of as a bigot. What I see in an even larger sense is to make the world look like the church. The problem I think is that the church in doing so, begins to look like the world. In this sense. They are using politics to justify the gospel.
Whether I am relevant in the culture does nothing to the veracity of the Bible. Nothing.
Hear me on this, nothing short of a full-throated endorsement of secular humanism, Marxism, abortion, gay marriage, transgender whatever, or euthanasia will be enough to be considered relevant. Nothing.
I have heard the word sin used a lot this election cycle. Often it is invoked when an evangelical is a Trump supporter—or at the very least would consider voting for him given the circumstances. I have even heard it described as being opposite Jesus. When it does come to sin, I am more offended by statism, immoral taxation through threats, intimidation, and coercion, the engaging of our country in offensive immoral wars, and the murder of the unborn than I am by lewd comments made in every Marine Corps barracks every day of the week.
We hold our heroes in high esteem, but not all are squeaky clean. Not all talk like you or I. Many are rough around the edges. To deny that Patton could be a leader of men because of his mouth would be both insane and ignorant. To assume that President Eisenhower never engaged in loose filthy talk when among other officers is naïve. Winston Churchill was a great leader, but we all know he was vulgar in his personal life.  Yet, that will not stop pastors from using him as a sermon example this Sunday.
When it comes to Trump,  to overlook the off-duty conduct of the men I just mentioned, and allow for their veneration because they faced enemy fire in a foreign war, but not extend to another man the same grace is inconsistent.
But it is even more troubling for me. When it comes to Christians and the American political process: Why does decency and honor matter now? There have been great candidates for president who were solid Christian men of high virtue and character, and they were rejected as a laughing stock by many evangelicals for the likes of secular men, nominal Christians, and even a Mormon.
Whatever your views on some of the particular issues they embraced (remember I do argue on voting based on issues), the day that Bob Dole was chosen over Patrick Buchanan, or John McCain over Ron Paul, has in part, led us to our current predicament. From my perspective, Buchanan and Paul didn’t endorse immoral wars—and for that, they were rejected. Their character didn’t matter. Their positions on abortion didn’t matter. It didn’t matter that Ron Paul had an orthodox statement of faith on his campaign website. What does that say? We will take our medicine and vote for the lesser of two evils as long as he has an R by his name and holds to neoconservative foreign policy.
I want to say one more thing about Trump and his heinous and sickening talk about women (of which I am sure there will be more secret audio released). If some of my words or behavior from my life showed up on video, I would never show my face again in public. I have said and done horrible things that I am not proud of. Someone may have video or audio of me in a point in my life in which I was not living for God. I would shudder at the prospect of it being released on the internet. I don’t know Mr. Trump or Mrs. Clinton’s heart. Both have said and done things that are heinous. What I do know is that MY sin put Jesus Christ on the Cross of Calvary. For that, I should be disqualified from being a child of God. Despite the justice I deserved, Jesus took the wrath of God on himself—he waived my punishment. So when you get down to it, whether it be Trump or someone else: There but for the grace of God go I. Does that mean they should be president? No. What it means is that I can look at issues.
I am not in the position at this point in my life for me to stand here and point out the sin of another person, to call for the tearing down of Satan’s strongholds. How can I call for the vanquishing of Satan and his evil while I refuse to cancel my own television subscription?
Just a rhetorical question: I wonder if those who are quick to condemn another person’s sin would be willing to have their internet search history made public—or to have their life story shown on camera?
We should certainly hold these candidates to a high standard. The problem comes when we hold them to one that we aren’t held to. It costs something to hold ourselves to a high standard. It costs less to hold others to it. While I denounce Trump’s words from 11 years ago and demand differently, it doesn’t cost me to say it. It does cost me to turn the camera around and look at myself. I voluntarily pay taxes to a government that uses my tax dollars for immoral things. Among them is abortion. By paying taxes, I have blood on my hands. Then again, so does every evangelical leader who has never led a movement that said, “Stop the killing, stop the crime, we won’t pay another dime!” Not another dime until abortion mills are defunded. You might say, they couldn’t ever do that? Sure they could. Sure we could.
It might cost something. It might cost everything, but you could do it.
I think if nothing else, this election is putting a microscope on the Church as never before. We are impotent in the West to be an authoritative voice in the culture. Jesus said that the gates of Hell would never prevail against his Church. There is a church on every corner in America. There are seminaries all over the place. There are tons of pastors, deacons, elders, Sunday school teachers, and members. Why does it look like Hell is winning? Answer: Most of the aforementioned aren’t working for or living for the Lord.
Perhaps we need to hit rock bottom. After all, for many, it isn’t until they hit rock bottom that they learn that Jesus is THE Rock at the bottom. Maybe we as Christians need to live in a society in which it costs something to claim the name of Christ.
Right now it costs nothing. Our Christian brothers and sisters in the Middle East put us to shame. They are tortured and killed for the name of Christ, but they keep on living for Him.
I wonder—how would it look to the world if it cost everything to be a Christian? How would Christians look to the world? How many of our current Christian brothers and sisters would refuse to pay that cost? How many of our churches would become office buildings or community centers?
Whoever you vote for, remember, there is a much at stake. You can look at issues. You can look at character. You can look at both and see who would be more trustworthy. What you cannot do, in my opinion, is call another Christian “opposite Jesus” for doing what he feels is his responsibility as an American.
I leave you with this quote from John Lennox:
Christians in the New Testament lived under oppressive regimes guided by such figures as Augustus Caesar, Herod the Great, Nero, Caligula, Pontius Pilate, and others. Christians were persecuted, had few rights, no vote, could not run for public office, and were even killed for their faith—and yet Christianity flourished, eventually concerting the emperor himself. God has dealt with bigger problems before.
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Some thoughts on Adoption and Identity

Our beautiful son, John Will is turning one this week. I wanted to share with you a few thoughts as his birthday approaches.

I always viewed adoption as a good thing, but I have to be honest: For many years, I saw it like many people do—as a sort a predicament of permanent estrangement.  I mean, consider the reality:  The child will not grow up with his real parents.  He will never know his real siblings.  He and the adoptive parents will never have that real biological bond.  Then there is the most unfortunate part of all—He will always be the token adopted kid.

I know what you are thinking:  What do you mean by the word real?  Well, what does society say about it?  What is real to most people is what they see on TV or the internet.  If you listen to the armchair philosophers in the media, the above realities are real.  They are real in a ubiquitous sense.  Everywhere.  Case closed.  Settled science.  Hashtag it.

Let us be honest:  If the adopted baby happens to be of color, he could be looked at by his white parents and predominantly white peers as the definitive voice for the whole of the black race.  What he says about social justice will be accepted as gospel for many whites.  Can you hear it?  “My son is black, and he isn’t offended by that flag,” or, “My son is black—I couldn’t possibly be a racist!”  Because they have a black kid in the family, they think they are somehow experienced in the black experience.  He is their calling card in a sense.  Unfortunately, if he takes on the traits and speech patterns of his white adoptive family, he may run the risk of being an outsider when it comes to his black peers.  What if he grows up to be a political conservative in the vein of Clarence Thomas?  In this case, he will be cast out of the black community.  He will be in a sense living in no mans land.  A man with no country.  They may call him things like, “Uncle Tom.”  If he is nominated to the Supreme Court, men who are lifelong Lotharios (Ted Kennedy) may actually ask him during his confirmation process about his private entertainment habits.  This is just the truth.

Then, some will use him as certificate of absolution for white guilt.  By adopting a black child, they are absolving themselves of the great sin of the past:  Slavery.  They are enlightened now.  They are a part of the black experience.  They have evolved.

He will be seen as a racial bargaining chip in many instances.

If, on the other hand, he is adopted into a wealthy home, he could be seen as a status symbol.  Some people buy expensive rugs and pets from exotic places.  Today, the collector item that is style in some circles is the adoption of babies from exotic locations.  It is kind of like the cult of being a vegan, using a Mac, driving a Tesla, or choosing to obey the gluten free diet.  “Mine is from Nepal,” or “I got mine from Uganda.”  Two international adoptive mothers come into a coffee shop.  How do I know this?  They announced it loudly.

Then again, he might be seen as a leverage tool for advancing the pro-life agenda.  Heck, he may even be used just so that the parents feel good about themselves.

So, as for me, though I saw adoption as a positive, I saw it as the “last resort” option.

Because all the horrible things above exist, and I had just heard horror stories about them…I determined that adoption was better than abortion, but least the least preferable alternative.

This isn’t the first thing I have been wrong about.

The first thing that I failed to notice about my observations above is that they all presuppose that adoptive parents necessarily see their adopted kids as objects used for consumption rather than persons meant for relationships. In this thinking I was no different than the person who saw a black man as a piece of property.  I was no different in thinking that all whites think all blacks should be slaves.  My point is—though the above realities do exist—it doesn’t have to be that way.  The fact that those realities exist shouldn’t stop me from adopting a baby.  Why do I have to live like that?

I also failed to see that many of my objections came from an elitist progressive white Eurocentric worldview. Now, before you think I am some indoctrinated leftist who gets his news from the Daily Kos, hear me out.  I was Eurocentric.  Trust me:  The children in Mexico, war torn Africa, the slums of India, Thailand, or Vietnam—they would give anything to be adopted into a white family in the United States.  I am not even talking about a rich one.  Poverty in the United States is a lifestyle of luxury to the poor people in Laos.  I once heard a guy tell me about his ordeal in trying to gain citizenship into the United States.  I asked him why he wanted to come here so bad.  His answer blew me away:  “I want to live in a country where the poor people are fat.”

It isn’t insensitive or against multiculturalism or diversity to realize that compared to the rest of the world, the United States is the land of luxury.  This is the most exceptional place on the planet.  You want proof?  Go to the slums of India.  Check out the way people live in Cuba.  Go look at Kandahar.  Go see what they do to disobedient little girls in Saudi Arabia.  To presume that because I am from the West, that I couldn’t not contribute to the lives of people from the East is just absurd.

But then there is the unconditional love aspect—or sacrifice:  Many of the children adopted internationally have biological parents who love them so much, they would do anything for them to be adopted—just to escape real poverty.  The fact that I was unwilling to imagine such a reality shows how narrow minded I actually was.

But, then I also made the mistake of thinking that I wasn’t qualified to adopt. Sure, I had a biological child already—but adopt?  I don’t look like the adoption type, do I?  I have never contributed to any adoption agency.  I have never been a foster parent.  I have never sent money to one of those sad “Feed the Children” TV ads.  I am not an activist.  The only thing I know about kids is that I spoil my daughter.  How could I adopt?

Then I learned the reality:

Had we not adopted…our child—John William would have been aborted.

But my last objection was perhaps the most insidious of all: He will not share my genes!  He will never fit in at family reunions!  How will he carry on our family name—really?  He may have our name, but he isn’t one of us.  It could cause problems later on!  There might be challenges.  Oh No!

I can say it: What a bunch of narcissistic and selfish petulant idiocy. 

It is actually possible to adopt a child and love them for who they are—a distinct, unique, beautiful person—of infinite value.

Oh I forgot the other one:  We cannot afford it.  Ok.  My goodness…where is the faith?

Well, on a Wednesday in September of 2014, my wife got a phone call. It was through a convoluted maze of connections; but, there was a woman giving birth the NEXT day that wanted to give her baby for adoption.  Could we be at the hospital for the “C-section?”

After picking my wife up off the floor, we rushed to get ready for the birth of our…son.  We actually went that day and met the mother.  My son was in her belly sitting across the room from me.  She told us that she was at Planned Parenthood ready to abort the child–but something stopped her.  What?  Really?

Well, it happened.  He is our son.

Can I tell you that I have never viewed John William as adopted? I mean, I know he is, but—other than people bringing it up, or the doctor asking about his family medical history—I never think about it.  There has never been a moment in time that I knew about him that I didn’t think of him as my son.  What else could he be?  Who else could he be?  When he had trouble taking his first breaths, I felt pain.  When he had to have the chest tube and stay in the NICU for over a week—I felt the stress—and worried.  Me.  Not someone else.  I felt innate pain.

It may sound strange to you, but I see him in exactly the same way that I see our biological daughter, Ava. Even in the hospital, once he was born—with the birth mother just down the hall—he was my son.  Even as we waited the mandatory 72 hours for the birth mother to change her mind, I saw it as 72 hours for her to dispute the truth:  that I was the father of this baby!  When I first touched him, I didn’t feel that I was touching some child that we were going to take home—and learn to love.  I felt I was touching my son.  What womb he was carried in was the last thing on my mind.  I couldn’t have cared less.  When we went to visit him in the NICU, and had to use the name “Baby Boy White” to gain access, because they weren’t legally allowed to accept the name we had given him yet, we called him John Will.   You think that’s strange?  Can I tell you that when I look at him, I find myself involuntarily comparing his appearance to us?  “Oh, he looks like Ava when he does that.”  “Andrea, he has your smile.” “I think he has my…well, hopefully nothing.”  Maybe he does, maybe he doesn’t, but I identify him as ours.

Identity. What a word.  I don’t think I can remember hearing the word identity growing up.  Today, you cannot turn on a television set without hearing some blowhard pontificating about identity.  We live in a day and age where a man can use a woman’s restroom, so long as he self identifies as a woman.  If a woman in that restroom is offended by the presence of this man who identifies as a woman—it is HER problem.  She is the bigot.  His identity cannot be challenged.

Can I just say, our idea of identity is wrong? Our identity isn’t wrapped up in our sexual proclivity, our color, our intelligence, or our size.  Our identity is wrapped up in the idea of who we are.  Let me ask you a question:  Who are you…really?  How would you describe, you?  Most people would respond with a name and their occupation.  That isn’t what I asked.  I asked who you are?  There is more to who you are than what you do, your skin color, or what your name is.  If what you do is what defines you—then we have a pretty sad world.

Many today see themselves as objects to be consumed. They desire to be used as a commodity.  Just look at the clothing that many young people wear—or the outspoken statements on shirts that read, “I am a porn star.”  Even the LGBT movement—they will identify by their sex.  Ask them who they are and they will respond with their name and at some point their sexual proclivity.  If I were to walk into a room and say, “Hey, I am John and I am straight,” how would that be received?  It’s odd isn’t it?  So many of us place our identity in what we do, that we have no clue what a real person is.  If you think like that—that people are just objects, it will not only affect you:  It will affect how you treat those around you.  If we are nothing but the product of a mindless unguided process (Darwinian evolution), why would we treat each other as if we were more than just a bunch of matter?  What is the point?  But that question turns around:  If I am nothing but the product of evolution, why should anyone treat me as more than a heap of dirt?  There is no purpose.  The universe just is.  It’s all blind pitiless indifference.

Pathetic.  If you want to expose the malarkey in that, just walk up to the person that thinks that way—reach into their pocket—and take out their wallet.  Their real presuppositions about how they should be treated will emerge.

Why do I believe that people have worth? Well, quite frankly, it is because I believe that God created us in His image.

But, let us look at it a bit more philosophically:  If you take any philosophy in the world, you will find that it is based or grounded in one of three systems of thought.  They are epistemological, existential, and pragmatic.  Or quite simply, right thinking, right feeling, or right doing.  If you think the right things or acquire the right knowledge, or feel a certain set of feelings or have the right intentions or motives, or if you do the right things—you will have achieved what is ‘the good.’

Now the idea of good needs to be fleshed out. G.K. Chesterton once talked about what is good.  He wrote an essay called The Medical Fallacy in which he lamented the use of medical terminology when talking about social issues.  He noted that many politicians will say, “Our country is sick.  It needs a remedy.  Vote for me and my benevolent policies and we will see true healing begin.”  The problem Chesterton points out, is that social science is not medical science.  In medicine, doctors all agree on what a healthy body looks like.  They disagree on the malady.  In social science, it is the malady that is agreed upon.  We all can agree on what a dysfunctional society looks like.  It is the idea of what is good that we rip each other’s eyes out over.  One person sees this “solution” as a remedy—but the other guy sees the remedy as worse than the original problem.  Chesterton goes on to say, it may be necessary medically speaking, for a man to walk into a hospital and come out with one leg less.  But he quips, you will never see that man go into an operating room, and in a moment of ‘creative rapture,’ come out with one leg more.

The good. Can we find it in right thinking?  Many philosophies say yes.  How about in feeling or experience?  Many say yes.  How about in doing the right things?  Many say yes.  If our philosophy is based in these three areas, there are arguments to be made for which persons should be treated as objects.  Maybe they don’t have the right knowledge—or they are incapable of it.  Are they a drain on the taxpayers?  What is the solution?  Perhaps they haven’t experienced what they ought to—or they have the wrong feelings on a certain issue.  Can these bigoted people live in a tolerant and just society?  Then again, maybe they have done something that isn’t ‘o.k.’ by conventional standards.  Maybe they put up a flag on their flagpole that represents something awful.  Can we tolerate them?

Certainly arguments can be made that would subjugate each of these individuals to a second class.

The reason I believe people are of infinite worth is because I believe in a system that isn’t rooted in any of those three things. I believe in Jesus Christ.  Christianity is a system that is rooted in being—specifically—the being of Christ.  When I became a follower of Christ, my being was conformed to that of his.  I am no longer who I was before.  Now, I am an image of Christ.  This life isn’t rooted in right thinking, although there is no greater knowledge than knowing Christ.  It isn’t about feeling, even though I can think of no greater feeling than experiencing God’s presence.  And it isn’t about doing, even though Jesus said that true Christians will be known by what they do.

It is about being. I see people as beings—not machines.

Back to adoption:

Now, the conventional wisdom says children who are denied their biological parents—despite how wonderful their adoptive situation might be—face more challenges than other children. Those views all presuppose that we are purely biological.  I don’t buy this.  I have seen too much evidence to the contrary.  Plus, the Bible doesn’t teach this.  God told Jeremiah that He knew him before He formed him!  How could he know him before he was a living, breathing person?  Well quite simply, there is more to us than our bodies.  There is something to this knowing before forming business.  When I think about my biological daughter…I can safely say I didn’t know her or have any knowledge of her before she existed.  But God did.  There is something to that.

Ephesians says that before the creation of the world God chose us! That has some serious implications.  First of all, to be chosen before the creation of the world, means that before the first act of creation—we had some sort of existence.  We at least existed in the mind of God before “In the beginning.”  Let us put it this way:  The crucifixion of our Lord was foreordained long before the first verse in Genesis.  Why?  Because there would be a need for redemption.  Why?  Because of us.  Second, the Bible says that God chose us.  Out of all the things in His creation that are beautiful—out of all the capable animals—he chose us.  Why us?  There is obviously something different or unique about us.  C.S. Lewis once said that we aren’t bodies with a soul; we are souls with a body.  There is indeed something that I cannot see—or test in a laboratory—that makes my son who he is.  His physical appearance is a joy, but this is not who he is.  He is connected to us, despite what his DNA might say.  You could run a paternity test all day long, and I would fail it every time.  But you could put man after man in the room with my son and I am the only one he knows as “Da da.”  Despite the reality of what his DNA says he is, he is ours.  He is a person created for relationship!  He is a soul created in the image of God.  He has an identity that is beyond his blood and chemical makeup.  He was chosen before time itself.  God knew that this little boy would need a Mom and Dad who were not his biological parents.  A real sacrifice would need to be made for this little boy.  But more importantly, God knew that for this little boy, The ultimate sacrifice would have to be made on Calvary.

“Before” time began, my son and all his needs were known.

Likewise, you and I are connected to Christ despite what our pasts might say.  My spiritual DNA says sinner.  It does not say holy.  I am unworthy of the name Christian.  Despite that, Christ has adopted me as His child. I am connected to Christ despite the sins I will commit today.

Despite the reality of who I am, I am His.

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Abortion, Morality, and Common Sense

One of the questions that is incessantly asked today by the young and old alike is, “Can I afford to be moral?”  To Christians the answer should be simple; however, if you used today’s entertainment as your guide, the answer would be “No way!”  Just this morning, I read an article on a movie coming out in a next few days.  In a 100 minute movie, it offers nearly 30 minutes of explicit sexual content.  To make matters worse, the trailer for this film has made its way to the advertisements between your child’s Saturday morning cartoons.  The reason you see movies like this and the reason that the cost of morality is too high for many is because they have a warped view of what freedom is.  Many feel that freedom means being able to do whatever you want whenever you want however you want to do it.  This is wrong.

Do you remember 9/11?  I am sure you do.  Juxtapose that with the Enron debacle.  After the Twin Towers fell, the stock market crashed.  It was revived only days later.  When the Enron scandal happened, on the other hand, it devastated the world economy for much longer.  Apologist Michael Ramsden is correct when he notes that,

“Stock markets fell further and faster after the Enron and WorldCom scandals than they did after the terrorist attacks of September 11, telling us that what the market fears most is not a terrorist attack from without but a moral corruption from within.”

True freedom is a moral concept.  When you remove moral standards you have a collapse of virtue.  In a immoral society—where people do whatever they want, whenever they want, however they want to—you have anarchy.  And societies which are ruled by anarchy are marked out by a loss of freedom, not an increase of it. Benjamin Franklin was right when to say,

“Only a virtuous people are capable of freedom. As nations become more corrupt and vicious, they have more need of masters.”

 

So to the question, “Can I afford to be moral,” I would answer simply that the cost of compliance is high, but the cost of failure is catastrophic.

Speaking of morality…

Here we are 41 years after the egregious Supreme Court case, Roe versus Wade, and the World Health Organization reports that as of this moment for the year 2015, there have been 2,468,131 abortions worldwide. I have written elsewhere about the logic of the pro-life vs the pro-abortion position, and there is no need to rehash that here.  What I want to do instead is just offer the sobering numbers.  Abortion is the most common medical procedure performed today.  It has become, as one journalist referred to it, “As American as apple pie.”

The first thing to ask is, “What counts as an abortion?” An abortion is the termination of a pregnancy by the removal or expulsion of an embryo or fetus from the uterus, resulting in or caused by its death. Abortion as a term most commonly used- and in the statistics presented here – refers to the induced abortion of a human pregnancy, while spontaneous abortions are usually termed miscarriages.

Each year, according to the WHO, there are nearly 40-50 million abortions. This means that each day there are approximately 125,000 abortions each day. 

What about the USA? In our country, almost half of the pregnancies that occur are unintended.  Of these unintended pregnancies, 40% are terminated by abortion.  Each day, there are about 3,000 abortions in our country.  Of all pregnancies in the United States (not including miscarriages) 22% end in abortion.

Nancy Pelosi, just the other day, said:

“The fact is what we have said. The life and the health of a mother is what is preeminent when a decision is made about a woman’s reproductive health…It isn’t an ideological fight…It’s a personal health issue. This is up to women — their conscience, their god their doctor, their health, their fate, survival.”

One of the frequent reasons for abortion that is commonly presented is that there are cases where abortion is necessary to save the life of the mother.  The other one typically  used is, in the case of rape or incest.

  1. Everett Coop, the former Surgeon General said this of his experience with protecting the woman’s health:     “In my thirty-six years in pediatric surgery I have never known of one instance where the child had to be aborted to save the mother’s life.” I guess his experience is not worth our taking serious?

Coop went on to say, “When a woman is pregnant, her obstetrician takes on the care of two patients—the mother-to-be and the unborn baby. If, toward the end of the pregnancy complications arise that threaten the mother’s health, he will take the child by inducing labor or performing a Caesarian section.”  In continuation, Coop noted that in this situation the doctor has the intention to, “ Save the life of both the mother and the baby.”  Now of course, if this occurs, “The baby will be premature,” but even then, “The baby is never willfully destroyed because the mother’s life is in danger.”

What is most troubling is when a doctor knows that a child could survive (a natural birth or a botched abortion), and that the mother’s health is in no way threatened; but cowing to societal pressure and the demands of the mother, they admit to performing abortions because it is what the patient wants them to do.  Even our current president, Barack Obama, four times before he was elected president, voted not to save a baby that was born in the wake of a botched abortion.  Because the mother intended abortion, if the abortion fails and the child survives, the legislation Obama supported makes it legal to kill the baby.  How is this not murder?  Do the wishes of a mother override the rights of a living, breathing, human being?

When it comes to abortion, there are only a few logical situations possible.

The first is that either the fetus is a person or it isnt a person.

There are two possibilities about whether or not a fetus is a person.

  1. Maybe you know that it is a person.
  2. Maybe you don’t that it is.

To this, there are two possibilities—either you are right or you are wrong.

So—from here ,there are four logical outcomes:

  1. The fetus is a person, and you know it. You’re right.
  2. The fetus is not a person and you know that. You’re right.
  3. The fetus is a person and you don’t know that. You think it’s not. You’re wrong.
  4. The fetus is not a person and you think it is. You don’t know the truth. You’re wrong.

Now these are the only possible scenarios (Like a Pascal’s wager, two chances of being right, two chances of being wrong).

The question is, what would you call abortions in each of these instances? These are the only four possible situations logically. What are they? Murder is case number 1. Manslaughter is case number 2. Criminal Negligence is case number 3.

In reality, only the fourth case justifies abortion.

That is the thing about abortion.  If the fetus is a human being, abortion is wrong.  If it is not a human being, then it isn’t wrong.  When my daughter is behind me and says, “Daddy can I kill this,” my response is dependent on what “this” is.  If “this” is her baby brother, the answer is “No!”  If “this” is a cockroach, the answer is, “I will do that for you!”

So, when does life begin?  We know what progressives tell us (with not a speck of evidence mind you).  They say that life begins at birth, or when a child becomes aware of its surroundings, or when it can anticipate pain.  Even Peter Singer and Richard Dawkins say that a newborn baby is less viable than a baby pig.  Most Zoologists and biologists will say that life is a continuum from fertilization until the organism dies. They apply this to birds, dogs, snakes—every organism.  Why should it be different for a human?

I love what Ravi Zacharias says concerning the beginning of life:

“Vice-Presidential candidate Al Gore was debating Vice-President Dan Quail. They were arguing on the abortion issue. Dan Quail, a very committed man, was very devoutly committed to the preservation of the unborn and risked his entire political career on that…At a moment, Gore really pinned him with his back to the wall… And Gore was very sharp, he was brilliant. They teach you in debate ‘if you can’t give your own answers, learn to question the opposition.’ And Gore looked at him, eyeball to eyeball, and says “Sir, Dan, would you repeat after me that ‘a woman has the right to her own body’. Would you repeat that after me, Dan? That ‘a woman has the right to determine the destiny of her own body’.” Three times he slammed him with that comment, “Repeat after me, Dan…”

Ravi continues,

“And of course poor Mr. Quayle could not really come back at that kind of an approach. He came up with a very meaningful answer but did not satisfy the taunt.  He said “Well, every time you abort a baby you stop a beating heart.

What I think would have been an ideal response would have been something like this, I think.  Senator Gore had already said he was personally against it but politically he felt it was the right of the person to make the decision. So the response should have gone something like this, I believe: 

Senator Gore, would you first repeat after me that ‘the life within that mother’s womb is a human life.’ Would you repeat that after me? Because if the answer to that is yes, what are you doing obliterating life? If the answer to that is no, why are you personally against it? If the answer to that is ‘I don’t know’, how many more decisions are you going to make on an agnostic platform?”

 

Many on the side of abortion say that they are pro-choice politically, but they are personally opposed to abortion.  You might hear it put this way:  “I am against abortion.  I would never have one.  On the other hand, I do not feel like the government should make a woman give birth.  For that reason, I am pro-choice.”  Such a statement sounds fair enough.  The problem is, when you really think about what they have said, you realize just how evil that is.

Here is the question:  For what other reason could someone be opposed to abortion besides their compulsory belief that a fetus is more than just a blob of cells—but a life?

How have we gotten a place where the medical community allows itself to be pushed by social planners into being both caregivers and executioners?  Mark my words, an abortionist is an executioner.  What about infanticide in ICU units?  This is murder as well.  The slippery slope keeps going too.  One day, what prevents societal pressure and political correctness from demanding that the doctor become the executioner of the elderly?

The immediate access to abortion is horrific as well.  A husband has nothing to say regarding the matter now.  A husband cannot legally stand up for the life of his unborn child.  All choice is given to the mother.  When it comes to minors who want to have abortions, their parents have no right to say anything.  A child can have an abortion without the parent’s approval, but cannot go to the mall and get her ears pierced without parental consent.

Of course, to look at the story of the incarnation of Christ gives us reason to pause.  The story of Mary becoming impregnated with the Son of God leaves no room for doubt.  The angel told Joseph, “That which is conceived in her is of the Holy Spirit.” From the moment of conception God had entered human life. The soul that I am has also existed from the moment of conception.

We have to be educated.  We have to talk to our friends and family about the origin of life.  Even before a woman knows she is pregnant, 21 days into it, the baby demonstrates a heartbeat.  By the sixth week the adrenal gland and the thyroid are functioning. A child’s fingerprints are indelibly in place by the twelfth week. Abortion kills a developing human being! No matter how old or how large the organism is when he/she leaves the womb, that emergence—by whatever means—is still a birth.

If the developing fetus isn’t a human being, then what is it?  A dog, a pig, or something else?

What is wrong with forcing a woman who seeks an abortion to look at the sonogram of her baby?  Why shouldn’t she have to wait a period of 24 or 48 hours after giving consent for the abortion?  If it is really about informed choice, why not give her all available information so she can make that choice?  Show her the data.

The left doesn’t want her to know the truth.  It doesn’t want her to think it over.

What will come next?  I think it is arguable that we are horribly close to being in 20th century Germany—here in the United States of America.

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Does Sin Exist?

We live in period of history in which nothing is wrong, well except to claim unequivocally that there is such a thing as wrong.  We live in a society that that feels that nothing is off limits, well except the idea that there are things that are off limits.  We happen to live in a world that dogmatically asserts that what we do is what we are wired to do.  That is, in the words of Richard Dawkins, it is our DNA that dictates what we do, “and we just dance to its music.”  We have moved a long way from Flip Wilson’s, “The devil made me do it.”  Now, we are prisoners of our own material body.  My DNA made me do it!

Before you you go believing this rubbish, let me just plant a word of doubt and skepticism in your mind (and yes you can be skeptical of the self styled freethinking skeptics).  When someone says that you are pre-wired to behave a certain way based on your DNA or molecular makeup, what they are saying is:  You are determined.  Determinism is the view that there is no free will and that we are captive to time, matter, and chance.  In a sense, it is the belief that Darwinian evolution is in business, and it will do what it likes–including controlling your behavior and thoughts.  Here is the problem.  If one holds to determinism, by definition, they did not come to hold this view based on weighing the pro’s and con’s for the argument.  They weren’t persuaded rationally to believe that determinism is true.  Instead, determinism would purport that they just hold the view because they were determined to do so.  If we are determined to do the things we do and believe the things we believe, how can we rationally affirm anything?  How can determinism be rationally affirmed if we are predetermined to believe it?

Don’t buy this stuff. Well, that is, if you are determined not to buy it, don’t buy it.  If you are determined to buy it, you have no choice. (please sense the sarcasm)

 


 

Now, the more interesting question is,does sin exist? Is man by nature good, or is man evil? These are questions that must be answered.  And trust me, regardless what worldview a person holds–whether they are a theist, atheist–whatever–they have a position on these issues.

Consider a story:

“Two brothers were notorious around town for being as crooked in their business dealings as they could possibly be. That notwithstanding, they continued to progress from wealth to greater wealth until suddenly one of the brothers died. The surviving brother found himself in search of a minister who would be willing to put the finishing touches to the funeral. He finally made an offer to a minister that was hard for him to refuse. “I will pay you a great sum, he said, “if you will just do me one favor. In eulogizing my brother, I want you to call him a ‘saint,’ and if you do, I will give you a handsome reward.” The minister, a shrewd pragmatist, agreed to comply. Why not? The money could help put a new roof on the church.

When the funeral service began, the sanctuary was filled by all the important business associates who had been swindled through the years by these two brothers. Unaware of the deal that had been made for the eulogy, they were expecting to be vindicated by the public exposure of the man’s character.

At last the much-awaited moment arrived, and the minister spoke. “The man you see in the coffin was a vile and debauched individual. He was a liar, a thief, a deceiver, a manipulator, a reprobate, and a hedonist. He destroyed the fortunes, careers, and lives of countless people in this city, some of whom are here today. This man did every dirty, rotten, unconscionable thing you can think of. But compared to his brother here, he was a saint.”

Every group of students I tell this joke to laugh out loud.  Why?  What is it about this story that resonates with all who hear it, regardless of cultural background or place of birth? Why can a stadium of people hear this story through their respective linguistic interpreter, and all at once let out a seismic roar of laughter at the punch line? The answer is quite simple. We are all aware of what man can be at his worst. We know the evil that resides within all of us and what it can do if allowed to prevail. If this was not a common understanding, there would be no laughter. Am I wrong?

I am reminded of the great English journalist Malcolm Muggeridge, who wrote in the first volume of his two-volume biography, a story that dealt with sin.

Working as a journalist in India, he left his residence one evening to go to a nearby river for a swim. As he entered the water, across the river he saw an Indian woman from the nearby village who had come to have her bath. Muggeridge impulsively felt the allurement of the moment, and temptation stormed into his mind. He had lived with this kind of struggle for years but had somehow fought it off in honor of his commitment to his wife, Kitty. On this occasion, however, he wondered if he could cross the line of marital fidelity. He struggled just for a moment and then swam furiously toward the woman, literally trying to outdistance his conscience. His mind fed him the fantasy that stolen waters would be sweet, and he swam the harder for it. Now he was just two or three feet away from her, and as he emerged from the water, any emotion that may have gripped him paled into insignificance when compared with the devastation that shattered him as he looked at her.  Muggeridge writes:

“She came to the river and took off her clothes and stood naked, her brown body just caught by the sun.  I suddenly went mad.  There came to me that dryness in the back of my throat; that feeling of cruelty and strength and wild unreasonableness which is called passion.  I darted with all the force of swimming I had to where she was, and then nearly fainted for she was old and hideous and her feet were deformed and turned inwards and her skin was wrinkled and, worst of all, she was a leper.  You have never seen a leper I suppose; until you have seen one you do not know the worst that human ugliness can be.  This creature grinned at me, showing a toothless mask, and the next thing I knew was that I was swimming along in my old way in the middle of the stream—yet trembling…It was the kind of lesson I needed.  When I think of lust now I think of this lecherous woman.” 

The experience left Muggeridge trembling and muttering under his breath, “What a dirty lecherous woman!” But then the rude shock of it dawned upon him—it was not the woman who was lecherous; it was his own heart.  He was the lecher.

Muggeridge himself admitted the real shock that morning was not the leper, as mind-banding as that would be. Rather, it was the condition of his own heart, dark, with appetites overpowering his weak will. He writes,

“If only I could paint, I’d make a wonderful picture of a passionate boy running after that and call it: ‘The lusts of the flesh.’”

Muggeridge, who was himself a latecomer to the faith, would go one to say,

“The depravity of man is at once the most empirically verifiable reality but at the same time the most intellectually resisted fact.”

Are instances like this reserved for the elite caste of the most lecherous and morally repugnant individuals in society? Hardly. Think back to the great figures we know from the Bible. David, a man after God’s own heart. He let sin overcome him and it let to lust, immorality, deceit, murder, prevarication, and dishonor. Why? All because of sin that was not dealt with properly. Think of King Saul. Perhaps Saul is a man who could have been the greatest King to ever live. What was his problem? Pride. He could not stand the fact that David had slain the giant, and as a result the songs were being sung about him, and not himself. This sin led to problems. Remember Jonah? His sin of disobedience didn’t only affect him, it affected all of the other men on board the ship!  If you remember, it took the pagan captain of the ship to get Jonah to pray to God!  You know things are messed up when sin takes control of your life to the point that unbelievers are willing to ask YOU to try God out.

I was once talking to a woman about the Christian view of the world, and she admitted,

“Being a woman about to give birth, I do wonder to myself how anyone could bring a baby into such an evil world.”

I responded to her,

“You are right about the evil out there, but what about the evil in us–in you?”

You know, the Bible refers to sin not only as being something that we do, but also as a power that controls and consumes us.  It isn’t that we do sinful things, but rather, that we are sinful.

Sin is a problem!

 


 

Fast forward to our modern age. Sin has become a problem “no more.” Sin is now seen by the postmodernists, liberals, and relativists as merely a concoction and archaic holdover from fundamental Christian dogmas.  Jacques Derrida, Michael Foucault, and their ilk will tell you there there is no absolute truth (though didn’t they just state an absolute in making their claim?). There is no absolute truth; so, how could there be something called sin?  It was Foucault who noted,

‘To die for the love of boys: what could be more beautiful?’

and,

‘all the rest of my life I’ve been trying to do intellectual things that would attract beautiful boys.’

 

Isnt it a shame that a man could admit these things, but his biographer only refer to them as the “passions of Foucault?”  This isn’t passion, this is depravity.

 

This refusal of sin as a reality affects more than just sexual freedom, however.

C.E.M. Joad once noted that

“It is because we rejected the doctrine of original sin that we on the [political] Left were always being disappointed”

Unfortunately for the Left,  this is right (pun intended).  Why is it that we can erect all-powerful legislation and control the lives of all citizens, yet still stand in complete shock when something tragic happens at the hands of human beings?  I posit that it doesn’t matter how many laws are instituted.  If man doesn’t realize that sin is real, and that evil is a reality, then I agree with Dr. Johnson who lamented:

“All the laws of heaven and earth are insufficient to restrain them from their crimes.”

 

I think G.K. Chesterton can teach us a few things when it comes to this issue of objective sin.  First of all, objective morals do exist.  Chesterton once noted that,

“Though we may differ over whether or not abortion is virtuous, we all agree that they should be performed with sterilized instruments.”

That quote may seem a bit harsh, but think about it.  Two people may disagree over the virtue of abortion–that is to say, whether it is right or wrong.  What they do not disagree over is the medical necessity of universal precautions.  Why are precautions universal if there werent a moral mandate to take care of the patient because–well–life matters?

This is the essence of the medical mistake.

G.K. Chesterton taught us that in medicine we all agree on what a well person is, but disagree on what sick is. In social and political theory however, we agree on what a malady looks like, but tear our eyes out over what a well-functioning society looks like.  The problem is, politicians and social critics continually use medical terminology to talk about social issues–“The health care situation in this country is sick.  It needs to be reformed.”  OR  “The country is sick–vote for my policies, and we can return it to health.”  This is a fallacy says Chesterton.  How can they talk about what ‘well’ is in absolute terms, if the idea of well is the most disputed issue in all of academia?  Only in medicine can this terminology be used.   It is a fact that a man may have pain in his leg and walk into a hospital, and due to medical necessity, come out with one leg less. Never will that man walk into a hospital and in a moment of creative rapture, walk out of the hospital, having being given one leg more.

Absolutes do exit.  Wrong exits.  Good exists.  We just refuse to say what it is.

I believe that Oliver Sacks, an M.D. who is no Christian said it best in his blockbuster book, Awakenings:

“For all of us have a basic, intuitive feeling that once we were whole and well; at ease, at peace, at home in the world; totally united with the grounds of our being; and that then we lost this primal, happy, innocent state, and fell into our present sickness and suffering. We had something of infinite beauty and preciousness-and we lost it; we spend our lives searching for what we have lost; and one day, perhaps, we will suddenly find it. And this will be the miracle, the millennium !”

Did you understand that?  Isn’t that interesting?  Billions of dollars have been spent on research–and here we are–stuck at Genesis 3.

Along those lines, here is an interesting quote from the renowned professor of psychology; and one time president of the American Psychological Association, Hobart Mowrer. This man was also an atheist who took his own life in his seventies:

“For several decades we psychologists looked upon the whole matter of sin and moral accountability as a great incubus and acclaimed our liberation from it as epoch making. But at length we have discovered that to be free in this sense, that is, to have the excuse of being sick rather than sinful, is to court the danger of also becoming lost… In becoming amoral, ethically neutral and free, we have cut the very roots of our being, lost our deepest sense of selfhood and identity, and with neurotics, themselves, we find ourselves asking, “Who am I, what is my deepest destiny, what does living mean?”

What is the solution?  The modern man has a solution for what the archaic man calls sin. That solution is education.  Notice that the boundaries of this debate are enforced by the self styled intellectual caste.  Is this really the way things should be?  Wasn’t Oliver Wendell Holmes correct when he stated, “The life of the law is logic not experience”?

Contrary to the beliefs of modern utopianists, education does not change the way people behave. This has been exemplified by various instances of white collar crime where ivy league university graduates are the ones committing the crimes. What then is the difference between the common street criminal and the thoroughly educated high class criminal? Method and magnitude! The common street criminal will employ crude weapons to steal a car from the other end of town. The educated criminal will employ his academic degrees to gain prominence and steal millions of dollars from the corporation that he runs. The uneducated criminal will break into a house and rape a woman. The educated criminal will use position and power to rape a nation.

As D.L. Moody put it,

“If a man is stealing nuts and bolts from a railway track, and, in order to change him, you send him to college, at the end of his education, he will steal the whole railway track.”

It is a snobbish assumption that the ignorant are the dangerous criminals. The most dangerous criminal is the educated criminal. All education does is to make the criminal more sophisticated.

The only solution to sin can be found in the person of Christ. Listen to what an the avowed skeptic, E.H. Lecky had to say on the matter:

“It was reserved for Christianity to present to the world an ideal character, which through all the changes of eighteen centuries has inspired the hearts of men with an impassioned love; has shown itself capable of acting on all ages, nations, temperaments, and conditions; has not been only the highest pattern of virtue, but also the strongest incentive to its practice; and has exercised so deep an influence that it may be truly said that the simple record of three short years of active life has done more to regenerate and to soften mankind than all the disquisitions of philosophers and all the exhortions of moralists.”

G.K. Chesterton said that original sin is as “practical as potatoes.” We may try to deny it, overlook it, or re-describe it, but the fact remains. We are capable of many kinds of evil. The diseases of the body are not nearly as hideous and grotesque as the diseases of the soul.

It is not merely external behaviors that vex our souls, but our internal intentions as well. Jesus explained this clearly when he said that if we lust after a woman we commit adultery with her in our hearts; that if we are unforgiving of our brother, it is like murdering him. Jesus brings ethics from the social sphere to the personal one by showing how intentions can be just as wicked as actions.

Have we taken stock of our soul recently? Have we sensed the nuances of evil in our own hearts? We need to stand guard today, and every day, with humility that we are capable of terrible evil. And at the same time, we need to avoid those things that draw us into it. Sin starts at the heart level and works its way outward.

Comparatively, leprosy on the body is not nearly as ugly as the pockmarks of sin on the soul. The good news is that Christ has broken the power of both and asks us to begin eternity now by building a soul in this world appropriate for our glorified body in the next.

How do we find the answers?  What worldview gives us a hope? Ravi Zacharias gives us an interesting method:

First, there are 3 tests that a worldview must pass.  It must be:  1)Logically consistent (its teachings cannot be self-contradictory), 2)Empirically Adequate (its teachings must match with what we see in reality, 3) experientially relevant (its teaching must speak directly to how we actually live our lives.

Second, each worldview must address the following four ultimate questions:  1)Origin (where do the universe and human beings come from?), 2)Meaning (What is the meaning or purpose of life?), 3) Morality (how do we know what is right and what is wrong?), 4) Destiny (What happens to us after we die?)

Third, there are five academic disciplines that must be employed to comprehensively study a worldview:  1) Theology (the study of God), 2)Metaphysics (the study of what is ultimately real), 3)Epistemology (the study of how we can know things), 4) Ethics (the study of moral right and wrong), 5) Anthropology (the study of what and who humans are).

You will find that only a worldview based upon God and through a relationship with the person of Christ will one view hold up to this test.  But, don’t take my word for it.  Do your own work.  Try it.

Joseph Damien was a missionary in the 19th century who ministered to people with leprosy on the island of Molokai, Hawaii.  Those suffering grew to love him and revered the sacrificial life he lived our before them.  But even he did not know the price he would pay.  One morning before he was to lead them in their daily worship, he was pouring some hot water into a cup when the water swirled out and fell onto his bare foot.  It took him a moment to realize that he had not felt any sensation.  Gripped by the sudden fear of what this could mean, he poured more boiling water on the same spot.  No feeling whatsoever.

Damien immediately diagnosed the problem.  As he walked tearfully to deliver his sermon, no one at first noticed the difference in his opening line.  He normally began every sermon with, “my fellow believers.”  But this morning he began with, “My fellow lepers.”

In a greater measure, Jesus came into the world knowing what it would cost Him.  He bore in His pure being the marks of evil, that we might be made pure.  “For this I came into the world,” he said (John 18:37).

The gospel points to the person of Christ who went to the cross, not just to transform the Jeffrey Dahmers and the money-grabbers behind the scenes, but to renew even those whose self-righteousness blinds them to their own need.  It wasn’t just the prodigal who squandered the fathers love, it was also the older brother—for he was so close to the fathers love the whole time.

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